Categories
Science

On the Neurobiology of Wisdom

Wisdom is conventionally talked about as an abstract characteristic, however, “Is There a Seat of Wisdom in the Brain?” introduces evidence that suggests wisdom may have neurobiological roots. Researchers at the University of California San Diego broke down wisdom into the traits that commonly define it across different cultures such as “empathy, compassion or altruism, emotional stability, self-understanding, and pro-social attitudes, including a tolerance for others’ values.” After breaking it down into these less abstract abilities, the researchers performed a series of studies to monitor blood flow to the brain while performing different tasks related to the aforementioned abilities. Remarkably, they found that the parts of the brain related to the attributes of wisdom use multiple parts of the brain each, encompassing the entire brain. 

I believe the research was credible, involving physical evidence (the monitored blood flow to different regions of the brain). This research is important because it could not only lead to developing strategies to increase a person in their wisdom, but it could also shed some light on the effect of various neurological diseases on a person’s wisdom (the various attributes that commonly define it). In the words of the researchers, “Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms in the brain could potentially lead to developing interventions for enhancing wisdom.” Perhaps in a future society, our understanding of the neurobiological roots of the attributes that make up wisdom will lead us to be more critical thinking, empathetic, altruistic, and emotionally stable.

Works Cited

University of California – San Diego. (2009, April 7). Is There A Seat Of Wisdom In The Brain?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 27, 2020, from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090406192244.htm

By abdullahkinan

24, college student, cars, science, blah blah

2 replies on “On the Neurobiology of Wisdom”

The key part of your piece:

“In the words of the researchers, “Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms in the brain could potentially lead to developing interventions for enhancing wisdom.” Perhaps in a future society, our understanding of the neurobiological roots of the attributes that make up wisdom will lead us to be more critical thinking, empathetic, altruistic, and emotionally stable.”

We’ll spend hundreds of billions of dollars developing better war machines and comparably very little on this sort of research. Shows why we’re so screwed up.

Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.